Mon. Oct 3rd, 2022

Image for article titled Two Half Baths Don't Equal Full, and Other Real Estate Bathroom Math You Should Know

Image: Artazum (Shutterstock)

Previous weekend we talked about residence bathroom sizes—as in, what you get in a half-tub compared to a 3/4-bath or a full-bathtub. And even though that details is essential for decoding that terminology in serious estate listings, there’s a different aspect that isn’t precisely straightforward either: The overall selection of loos in a household.

Even though we use fractions as shorthand for describing how several fixtures are in a bathroom, you can’t merely increase these fractions up to compute the full range of bogs in a house, as it would look in a true estate listing. In other terms, two 50 %-baths really don’t equivalent one complete-bath. Right here are some suggestions for approaching this and other actual estate toilet math.

Calculating the range of loos in a property

There is some variation in how serious estate agents determine the full quantity of bathrooms in a property, but frequently speaking, you get started by adding the amount of complete loos together. This commonly ends up getting the initially/complete quantity in the listing (that will come before the decimal place or portion).

Then it’s time to aspect in the 3/4-, half-, and 1/4-baths—which is the place points can get tricky. The good thing is, lots of properties have rather uncomplicated combos of comprehensive- and 50 %-baths. So, for example, if there are two total loos upstairs and a 50 percent-bathtub powder home downstairs, that would be a 2.5-rest room home— even however there are a few rooms in the house that most persons would discover as bogs.

Calculating a lot more advanced lavatory math

Now that we have coated the essentials, it is time to deal with more complex lavatory math, starting off with 3/4 bathrooms. This relatively new true estate time period refers to a lavatory with a sink, bathroom, and either a one shower stall, or a standalone bathtub with out a shower head. (In practice, though, it’s almost normally a shower stall.)

But thanks to innumerable house renovation projects that concerned eradicating the unique bathtub and replacing it with a much larger shower, some houses never have a tub at all. In that situation, actual estate agents are probable to refer to it as a full rest room.

As significantly as calculating the total number of loos when a 3/4-bath is included, here’s an illustration from Dan McCurley Authentic Estate:

1 complete-lavatory [toilet, sink, shower head & tub] + 3/4-bathtub [toilet, sink, & shower head] + 1/2-bath [toilet and sink] = 2.25 bathrooms

So he adds the 3/4 (.75) rest room and half (.5) lavatory to get 1.25 loos, which he then provides to the comprehensive-tub to get a whole of 2.25 bathrooms.

But this does not truly abide by his “two 50 %-baths don’t make a comprehensive-bath” rule. And irrespective of whether or not you agree with that math, it’s important to continue to keep in brain that you could encounter it in some real estate listings.

Listing as an alternative of introducing

There are also scenarios exactly where regular rest room math doesn’t make sense—especially in much larger residences with bathrooms galore. In individuals cases, adding up all the less-than-full loos go away inquiries about their configurations.

So when in doubt, list it out (or inquire the serious estate agent to do that for you if you’re bewildered looking at a listing). For illustration, if a house has four complete-bogs and a few fifty percent-baths, presenting it in that format offers more information and facts than listing it as having 5.5 bogs.